Collins & Demac Real Estate



Posted by Collins & Demac Real Estate on 6/18/2015

Did you know that your kids can lose from one to three months of learning over the summer? Studies suggest kids lose the most in math. Don't spend the summer going in reverse. There are many online sites that can help stop the summer brain drain. National Geographic Kids: offers great nature videos, activities, games, stories, and more CoolMath4Kids: take a trip through an amusement park of math and more at this extremely interactive math website Smithsonian Kids Collecting: how to start your own collection and see what other kids collect Explore Dinosaurs: FAQs and top 10 myths about dinosaurs, a virtual dig, behind the scenes tours, and more from the National Museum of Natural History Smithsonian Digging for Answers: a site that tests your research skills and knowledge NASA Quest: interactive explorations that engage students in real science and engineering. Topics include robots, helicopters, lunar exploration, and designing your own human-friendly planet My Wonderful World: a multimedia tour of our seven continents Time for Kids: fun games (The Great State Race), an online weekly magazine written for kids, and news from around the world Big Universe: an online library of fiction and nonfiction books for kids 0-12. The site also offers adults and kids the chance to create and publish their own stories.





Posted by Collins & Demac Real Estate on 6/6/2013

Sunscreen is essential but buying sunscreen can be very confusing. From water resistant sunscreens to SPF to broad spectrum protection, it is hard to know what you need to keep your skin safe this summer. Sunscreens protect you from the sun's ultraviolet (UV) radiation from reaching your skin. There are two types of ultraviolet radiation, UVA and UVB. They both damage your skin and increase your risk of skin cancer. The difference between UVA and UVB Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is part of the electromagnetic (light) spectrum that reaches the earth from the sun. Ultraviolet A (UVA) is the longer wave UV ray that causes lasting skin damage, skin aging, and can cause skin cancer. Ultraviolet B (UVB) is the shorter wave UV ray that causes sunburns, skin damage, and can cause skin cancer. The definition of SPF SPF stands for Sun Protection Factor. The SPF number on sunscreen is a measure of a sunscreen's ability to prevent UVB from damaging the skin. The number of the SPF is how long it will take the sun to redden the skin. For example, SPF 15 sunscreen theoretically prevents reddening 15 times longer than no sunscreen at all– about five hours. What is broad spectrum? Sunscreens that have broad-spectrum protect the skin from both UVA and UVB rays. Beginning in December 2012, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) will implement new rules for "broad-spectrum" products. New sunscreen rules Here are some of the new rules The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued for labels on sunscreen. • Sunscreens may be labeled “broad- spectrum” if they provide protection against both UVA and UVB radiation according to FDA-sanctioned test methods. • Only broad-spectrum sunscreens with an SPF of 15 or higher may state that they protect against skin cancer if used as directed with other sun protection measures. • Broad-spectrum sunscreens with SPFs of 2-14 must display a warning that the product has not been shown to help prevent skin cancer or early skin aging. • The terms “sunblock,” “sweatproof” and “waterproof” are no longer allowed on sunscreen labels. • Sunscreens may claim to be “water-resistant,” but must specify whether they protect the skin for 40 or 80 minutes of swimming or sweating, based on standard testing. Sunscreens that are not water-resistant must instruct consumers to use a water-resistant sunscreen if swimming or sweating. • A company cannot claim that its sunscreen products provide sun protection for more than two hours without submitting test results to prove this.      




Categories: Family   Buying a Home  


Posted by Collins & Demac Real Estate on 3/21/2013

sixteen girls being fed upWinter can leave everyone feeling a little stir-crazy.  If you find yourself battling a case of cabin fever, then consider these helpful hints to set your mind at ease. 1.  Invest in some board games.  They've come a long way since the days of checkers and chess.  Check out your local toy store, and drop some cash on these tried and true ways to pass the time.  Not only are they good for family time, but they can also be a lifesaver if you find yourself hosting a get-together gone stale. 2.  Get organized.  Spring cleaning is fine, but winter organizing can make your life a lot simpler, while providing you with something to break the monotony.  Go from room to room, and clean from top to bottom.  Organize those junk drawers.  There's really no need to wait for spring! 3.  Cook something fabulous.  Most people have at least one cookbook in their homes, and odds are, that cookbook hasn't done much more than collect dust.  Try your hand at some recipes you've never made before.  A new culinary skill can come in handy when entertaining guests as well. 4.  Make something awesome.  Try your hand at a new craft.  Candle making, terrarium building, and potpourri are all hobbies that are not only fun to try, but can add a touch of personality to your home.  Take a trip to your local craft store, and see if anything catches your interest.  If you become particularly skilled at the craft of your choosing, there's always room to make a little extra money from your endeavors. No matter what you end up trying out, keep in mind that doing something is always better than doing nothing.  Keeping your mind and body active in the winter is not only good for you, it's good for your home as well.




Categories: Family  




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