Collins & Demac Real Estate



Posted by Collins & Demac Real Estate on 11/5/2015

If you have been packing on the pounds it may be your kitchen that is to blame. New research has shown that it could be your kitchen making you gain weight. Here are some tips on how to keep your kitchen from contributing to a growing waistline. No Media The TV in the kitchen is now a media snack station. Parking yourself in front of the TV with food all around you makes snack time a lot easier. Computers in the kitchen can also lead to mindless munching and web surfing. It's too easy to grab a bite when all the food is within arm’s reach. Stand Up Who doesn't love an island prep station? But all the handy seating around the island is an invitation to linger over snacks. So lose all the stools to help resist temptation to gather in the kitchen. Open Invitation The so-called great room isn't so great for your weight. Combination living/kitchen areas make your kitchen the focal point of the home. Add a few partition walls or screens to keep the fridge and cabinets out of sight when relaxing, and watching TV in the living room. Skimp on Storage Pantries, large cabinets are so appealing and offer a great place to stockpile food. They also offer lots of temptation. Too many trips to bargain bulk stores will have your storage full in no time and also create a mentality of surplus. More is always more especially when it comes to food.





Posted by Collins & Demac Real Estate on 6/18/2015

Did you know that your kids can lose from one to three months of learning over the summer? Studies suggest kids lose the most in math. Don't spend the summer going in reverse. There are many online sites that can help stop the summer brain drain. National Geographic Kids: offers great nature videos, activities, games, stories, and more CoolMath4Kids: take a trip through an amusement park of math and more at this extremely interactive math website Smithsonian Kids Collecting: how to start your own collection and see what other kids collect Explore Dinosaurs: FAQs and top 10 myths about dinosaurs, a virtual dig, behind the scenes tours, and more from the National Museum of Natural History Smithsonian Digging for Answers: a site that tests your research skills and knowledge NASA Quest: interactive explorations that engage students in real science and engineering. Topics include robots, helicopters, lunar exploration, and designing your own human-friendly planet My Wonderful World: a multimedia tour of our seven continents Time for Kids: fun games (The Great State Race), an online weekly magazine written for kids, and news from around the world Big Universe: an online library of fiction and nonfiction books for kids 0-12. The site also offers adults and kids the chance to create and publish their own stories.





Posted by Collins & Demac Real Estate on 1/1/2015

Did you know the average household contains between 3 and 10 gallons of hazardous material at all times? This can be a threat to the health and indoor air quality of the home. How do hazardous materials enter your home?  They can enter in the form of cleaners, bleach, oil, light bulbs, paints, batteries, medicines, mercury-containing materials and other household items loaded with potentially harmful chemicals. So how can you keep your home free from these materials? First, you need to identify the hazardous materials in your home. They come in three forms: Solids (i.e. rat poison), Liquids (bleach, gas, antifreeze, drain cleaners.), Gases (such as natural gas or propane). The most important thing you can do to help make your home safer and avoid the dangers of hazardous materials is to store all hazardous materials properly. Always keep hazardous materials in the original container with the label for future reference. Follow all manufacturer suggestions for storage temperatures. Store flammables away from the home, any sources of flame or heat, and out of direct sunlight. Watch for fumes or other signs that the materials are not behaving properly. If you do detect fumes, wear a face mask, remove the leaking material, and ventilate the storage area properly to rid it of all dangerous toxins. Only purchase what you need when you need it. To further reduce your risk, look for safer alternative products like natural cleaners, mouse traps and paints.





Posted by Collins & Demac Real Estate on 4/17/2014

House plants can significantly improve the dynamic of a room.  While some are purely decorative, there are others that can have a dramatic effect on air and indoor pollution levels.  If you are planning on making a few botanical additions to your home, then why not get the added benefit of choosing plants that will work for you, as well as providing an aesthetic benefit?  Here are a few to get you started. Golden Pothos - This vine-like plant is very easy to grow, requiring very little light, and can survive quite comfortably if you happen to forget to water it on a regular basis.  With regular fertilizing, this plant becomes a fast-growing vine that looks fantastic in any room.  Clippings can be taken, put in water, and will develop root structures in as little as a few days.  Because this is a submersible plant, it is also popular with aquarium enthusiasts.  In addition, this plant is a heavy oxygen producer, and can also remove benzene, formaldehyde, and xylene from your air. Peace Lilies - Interestingly enough, these houseplants are not true lilies. These attractive members of the Araceae family need only a little light and water in order to survive, and produce brilliant flowers. Rubber Tree - While used as houseplants in North America, these plants have an interesting use in India; the roots are guided over chasms in order to create what is commonly referred to as living bridges.  These plants prefer bright sunlight, and while they can withstand infrequent watering quite well, they will thrive if given enough moisture. Weeping Fig - This is the official tree of Bangkok, Thailand.  In a study by NASA, this plant was shown to effectively remove airborne toxins from its environment.  This plant thrives in warm, sunny conditions, but can also tolerate low-light conditions fairly well.  If it is moved to a new room, it will shed a large number of its leaves, and replace them with new leaves in response to the change in light conditions.  While it is adaptive to changes in light, care should be taken not to place it in an area where it will be subjected to strong, cold drafts.  This plant is also popular among bonsai enthusiasts for its aesthetic properties. Snake Plant - Also known as "mother-in-law's tongue", this plant has been recognized in the same NASA study as one of the best plants to remove indoor air pollution.  Like other pollution-reducing plants, this one can survive quite well with low light levels and irregular watering.  Care should be taken not to over water this species, as the root structure is fairly sensitive. For further reading, you can pick up the book How To Grow Fresh Air, by B.C. Wolverton.





Posted by Collins & Demac Real Estate on 3/6/2014

Allergens, dust particles and pollutants all add up in your home and over time can lead to serious respiratory problems for its occupants. If you notice you are not breathing as easy as you should  or you just want to improve your indoor air quality there are steps to minimize the potential for dust particles in your home.

  • Clean your home regularly.
  • Use an air purification unit to attract dust particles and return cleaner air throughout the house.
  • Using an air-sealing product such as spray foam insulation to insulate and air-seal the home. This reduces  the amount of particles and allergens that enter the home.
These simple strategies will help significantly reduce the potential for respiratory problems in your home and you will be breathing easier in no time.







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