Collins & Demac Real Estate



Posted by Collins & Demac Real Estate on 11/16/2017

Your kitchen floor is what makes a statement in your home. The floor of the kitchen sets the design tone for the entire room. The choices for your kitchen floor are seemingly endless with tile to hardwood to everything in between. While the kitchen floor may not be on the top of the list during your kitchen remodel, it should be. These floors take quite a beating due to food being dropped, entertaining, foot traffic, and just overall frequent use. The flooring of the kitchen will help to pull the look of a room together and help to add value to your home. The floors should help accent the counters, appliances, and cabinets. Here, we’ll take a look at some of the most common kitchen flooring materials with some advice on how to choose what’s right for you

   


Stone Or Tile


These choices are perfect especially if your kitchen is a heavily traveled area. Let’s face it, most kitchens are where people come in and out, looking for food! Your decision will depend on where your kitchen is to the relationships of the main entrance to your home. 


Cork


This is a durable material that’s quite versatile and available in a variety of colors to suit your style. The great thing about cork is that it is water-resistant and it reduces noise from impact. This could be a great choice if you have children who love to run around and you also have a need for a quiet space upstairs. 


Wood Floors


Wood is to kitchen flooring what granite is to kitchen countertops. Wood just makes a kitchen feel classy. It’s great under your feet and durable at the same time. Wood can withstand heavy traffic, water stains, food spills, and more. You can even go for a less expensive alternative that gives the same look and benefits of wood for less.


Vinyl Flooring


If you’re on a budget, vinyl kitchen flooring is the way to go. these floors offer a variety of styles and color choices. The material can be purchased either in tile or sheet form.


Laying Down The Flooring


One of the biggest mistakes that homeowners make is not hiring professional help when needed to install things in the home. This applies to flooring as well. If you don’t feel comfortable laying down tile, or whatever type of flooring you choose, call the people who know how to do it best. Improperly installed flooring can lead to bumps, cracks, and the need for yet another new floor much sooner. It could be worth the extra investment to hire professional help to install your new kitchen floor.





Posted by Collins & Demac Real Estate on 11/9/2017

Home is probably where you go to feel completely comfortable, free of criticisms and safe. It's not just you. Your family and friends probably feel like they're safe when they stop by your place too. But, is your home as safe as  you think it is? If your house is like thousands of other homes across the United States, it might have accident provoking features, designs and damage, and you might not know it.

Don't deceive yourself about home safety

Each year millions of accidents happen in homes. Top of the list for accident causes is a fall. If you've lived in your home for several years, there's a good chance that you might have slipped at least once, maybe while climbing in or out of the tub or shower.

Reducing accidents at your home involves keeping flooring dry. Flooring should also be clutter free. It's easy to trip over a wheeled toy or a shoe when you get up to go to the bathroom in the middle of the night. Also, ensure that floorboards are secure and even.

Look for protruding nails and hammer these nails into floorboards until nail heads are even with floor panels. When you buff wood floors, get a great shine without buffing floors until they become slick. By tossing a throw rug at the entrance to rooms that you recently mopped, waxed or buffed, you could prevent falls.

Places at your house to zone in on to reduce home accidents

Floors aren't the only feature that may need your attention as you work to reduce accidents at your home. Other areas to focus on include:

  • Interior and exterior railings - Don't rely on the way that railings look. Actually pull on interior and exterior railings to see if they are secure. If not, get nails and a hammer or screwdriver and tighten loose railings.
  • Window panes - Open and close windows to ensure that your window panes don't accidentally open if a minor amount of pressure is applied to the panes. Contact a contractor to fix the panes if they are loose. Extra sealant might also make your house windows safe.
  • Reaching top cabinets - Step stools should be even. They also should be sturdy enough to prevent people from toppling over and falling while they reach for household items, including food, that's placed on a top shelf.
  • Poisonings - Secure dangerous cleaners. Keep medications out of the reach of children. If you notice missing prescription pills, consider locking medications in a cabinet or another secure container. To keep air safe, open windows in the room that you are using harsh cleaners in.

For added safety, you could install a banister and additional railings in your house,especially if you want to accommodate relatives and friends who are physically disabled. To make your house safer and avoid injuries, remove weather elements like snow, tree limbs and wet leaves from sidewalks and the edge of lawns. If you perform construction at your home, place warning signs near areas where the construction is taking place.




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Posted by Collins & Demac Real Estate on 11/2/2017

People often talk about boosting the value of their home with various improvements. But it is seldom that you hear anyone talk about the unforeseen factors that devalue their home. Furthermore, there are some fluctuations in a home's market value or appraisal value that are out of the homeowner's hands. In this post, we'll break down some of the broader aspects of home value and determine which "improvements" will serve you best in the long run. We'll also point out the red flags that are sure to devalue a home on the market.

Location

Few things so greatly affect the value of your home as location. If you happened to buy a house in Brooklyn Heights a couple decades ago its value has probably gone up exponentially since then due to the high demand of living in a trendy part of New York. Aside from living in the hippest neighborhood, people choose their home based on other location factors. Schools, hospitals, shopping centers, vicinity to highways or public transportation may all play a big role for many people. Location factors that will negatively affect the value of your home are high or increasing crime rates, economic decline (boarded up stores aren't very appealing to home buyers), a high incidence of registered sex offenders nearby, and neighbors that have unkempt homes or hoard junk in their yards. Other location factors are harder to sniff out. With the exception city dumps or waste processing centers--which you won't have any trouble smelling--having undesirable places like power plants or noisy freeways in your neighborhood can also devalue your home.

Inside the home

Home improvements are a great way to increase the value of your home--as long as those improvements meet a few criteria. Any changes you make should be legal and up to code. Potential buyers do not want the liability of illegal home improvements, nor can they ensure that the job was safely done and doesn't put them and their family at risk. Your improvements should also be up to social standards and changing tastes. Yes, we all have our own preferences when it comes to paint colors and home decorations. But when trying to sell a home it's important that it doesn't look like a time capsule from the 70s, rife with wood panels and shag carpets. When it comes to home repairs many homeowners elect to put off big projects because they are daunting and time consuming. Instead they focus on surface level improvements that might not do much to improve the value of their home. If you have plumbing that needs to be replaced, deteriorating flooring, or faulty heating and ventilation, make sure you take care of those before putting your home on the market.

Ask the pros

If buying or selling a home is in your foreseeable future, one great way to get a jump on your research is to consult a real estate agent and a building contractor to learn more about your area's own unique market values. This will give you a head start on making changes to your home and will tip you off on what to look out for when home hunting.





Posted by Collins & Demac Real Estate on 10/26/2017

We all have our own version of the ideal work environment. Some of us require a distraction-free bubble to be productive, whereas others prefer to work in a bustling cafe. There are many factors that contribute to workplace productivity and there have been numerous studies on that very topic, focusing on things like the best time of day to work, how often to take breaks, and even the benefits of looking at cute pictures of cats to boost your performance. For our purposes, we're going to focus on environment. Specifically, your home. We live in a time when more and more of us are unable to "punch out" at the end of the day and leave our work at the office. Whether it's checking emails, staying up late grading papers, or studying for a work-related exam, odds are you'll find yourself having to work in your home at some point. Step 1: Choose which room you will dedicate to work Whether it's a bedroom or home office, you'll want to be consistent with which room serves as your productivity zone. Just as you've trained your body to sleep when your head hits the pillow, you'll need to train your brain to work when you sit down at your desk at home. Step 2: Setting up your desk You won't get much work done if your back aches or if your chair is so comfortable that you're likely to fall asleep in it. Pick a chair that is sturdy and ergonomic, and make sure your screen and keyboard are at a good height so you aren't slouched. Step 3: Setting the mood If you need noise to work, determine what kind of noise will help you stay focused. There are sites like Noisli that let you combine different natural sounds. Pandora radio is free and will play a diverse mix of songs based on what you want to hear, and you can pay a small monthly fee to get rid of the ads. Maybe nature sounds and music are too distracting for you but the sound of silence is even worse. If that's the case you might want to invest in a white noise fan. Step 4: Do some decorating As important as the sound in your environment is what you put in it and how you arrange it. Depending on personal preference, you might want to keep your workplace either minimalistic or homey. You should also consider the lighting of the room. Dimming the lights a bit might save your eyes some strain if you're looking at a computer screen for hours at a time. Generally speaking, people work best in natural lighting (so avoid blue LEDs or harsh fluorescent bulbs). The options are endless and the best way to find out what keeps you productive is to experiment with different set ups. What's most important is that you find what works for you. And remember, this isn't the office; you have the opportunity to design a productivity sanctuary of your design. Why settle for anything other than perfect?





Posted by Collins & Demac Real Estate on 10/19/2017

If you’re trying to sell your home, there are many things you need to think about. One of the reasons that it’s wise to hire a realtor is that they can handle a lot of the difficult stuff for you. From home showings to phone calls to sealing the deal, your realtor will be with you every step of the way. 


One thing that you can do to help your realtor out is trying to avoid things that will scare off buyers in your home. While some things are out of your control (we’re looking at you radon), you can check and remedy a lot of problems before a buyer even sets foot in your home.


Leaky, Aging Roof


Roofs last around 20-25 years. If it’s been forever since you have paid attention to your roof, you’ll need to take a second look before selling. Your buyer is going to either ask for some kind of rebate or go for a home with a newer roof. Roofs are one of the things that home inspectors often see the most problems with.  



Outdated Gutters


If your gutters are in disrepair, you might want to have them cleaned or replace them altogether. Faulty gutters are often what causes problems with the roof. If rain water or snow melt can’t properly drain from the gutters, more leaks may be found in the home.  


Old Appliances


If your appliances are outdated, consider replacing them. Buyers don’t want to move into a new home only to need to head out to buy a new refrigerator, range, or dryer. Buyers like things to be ready for them, and they’re willing to pay for it. You’ll definitely get a return on your investment when you buy new appliances.    


Outdated Or Neglected HVAC System


It’s important to keep up with regular maintenance when it comes to your heating and cooling system. Keep it clean and keep regular maintenance appointments. These systems are costly to repair and buyers do not want to deal with these issues immediately (or ever if they could avoid them!) Get the HVAC system serviced before you put a for sale sign out front to keep your buyers happy throughout the inspection and sale process.   


High Price


Your realtor will be a big help in assisting you to price your home right. They will perform a CMA (comparative market analysis) in order to help you find the sweet spot for pricing your home. An overpriced listing will make buyers wonder. A property must be priced right in order to get buyers through the door to even look at the home.




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