Collins & Demac Real Estate



Posted by Collins & Demac Real Estate on 1/18/2018

When it comes to making your home and property safer for your family and others, the Boy Scouts motto says it all: "Be prepared!"

While it's next to impossible to completely eliminate all risks and potential hazards in and around your home, there are dozens of things you can do to make your property safer.

Every family's safety needs are unique, but here are a few basic precautions that can help reduce the chances of home accidents occurring -- both large and small.

Stair safety: All things being equal, it's riskier to walk down a flight of stairs than it is to walk on level ground. While that may seem obvious, most people don't stop and think about the potential risks of descending stairs as they're about to do it. Although tripping and falling on stairs can be injurious to just about anyone, it's especially dangerous for elderly people. From a homeowner's standpoint, there are several things you can do to reduce the risk of family or friends stumbling on your stairs. On an ongoing basis, it's necessary to make sure there are no loose objects on the stairs that could cause someone to lose their footing. Keeping stairs clear of toys, building blocks, and slipping hazards can be challenging if you have young children. Until they're taught to pick up after themselves -- which might occur sometime between now and college -- stair safety is an important issue to be aware of. Another key strategy for preventing household accidents is to make sure railings are properly installed and firmly anchored. Basement stairs can pose additional risks because they're sometimes inadequately lighted. Concrete floors at the bottom of some staircases can make a fall even more hazardous (not to mention painful). Increasing lighting, if needed, and making the bottom step more visible so that it's not accidentally skipped, are two preventative measures for reducing the chances of anyone falling on basement stairs.

Fire safety: Most people are aware that it's essential to have several working smoke detectors placed in strategic locations in your kitchen, bedroom area, and other parts of your house. Even though it's common knowledge, people don't always remember to install enough of them, replace worn out batteries when necessary, or test them every few months to make sure they're in good working condition. Some people remove the battery to silence smoke alarms while they're cooking, which can be dangerous if they don't remember to put them back afterwards. If your kitchen smoke detector has a "push to hush" button, then that can be a safer way to temporarily quiet a smoke detector when you're cooking dinner. Home fire safety also entails several other precautions, including having a fire extinguisher in the kitchen (and other areas), having a second-floor fire-escape ladder available, and teaching children how to avoid and respond to potential fire dangers. More detailed information and educational materials on fire safety is available from government agencies and non-profit organizations like the American Red Cross and the National Fire Protection Association.

Stay tuned to this blog for more helpful tips, pointers, and ideas for keeping your home safer and more secure.





Posted by Collins & Demac Real Estate on 8/18/2016

The kitchen stove is a common cause of fire in the home. The usual culprit of a stove top fire is grease which can be very dangerous and can spread quickly. It is important to know how to react when a grease fire happens. Here are some tips for putting out a stove top fire, should it happen to you: If the fire starts from grease in a pan, put a metal lid on top of the pan to smother the flames. Turn off the burner but don't move the pan. Leave the lid on until the fire is completely extinguished. If you have it handy you can use baking soda to put out the fire.†Never use water on a grease fire, it will make it worse. An ABC, dry chemical fire extinguisher can also be used effectively on grease fires. It is important to keep a small multi-purpose extinguisher in an easily accessible area of your kitchen. Never try to carry the fire outside. Moving the pan may cause the grease to splash, spread the fire, and cause burns. In case of an oven fire, turn off the oven and leave the door closed. After the fire is out, let the oven cool completely. If the fire becomes more than you can handle, leave and call 911 from a neighbor's house.







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