Collins & Demac Real Estate



Posted by Collins & Demac Real Estate on 4/13/2017

Your credit score impacts many of your important life decisions. From your ability to open new credit cards, to taking out loans for cars and houses, your credit will be checked by many companies throughout your life. Credit scores are mostly a mystery to the people who have them. Sure, you can check your credit score for free online, but when it comes to understanding your score, most consumers are in the dark. In a perfect world, we would be taught in high school and college exactly what goes into your credit score, how to build credit, and how to avoid credit missteps. Unfortunately, we don't live in that world and many of us don't find out what makes up a credit score until we're in debt from student loans or credit cards. In this article,  we'll teach you what a credit score is, what it consists of, and how it is affected by your financial decisions. And, we'll do it in an easy-to-understand way that skips all of the jargon and acronyms that are used by banks and lenders. Read on to learn everything you need to know about your credit score.

What is a credit score?

Simply put, your credit score tells lenders how safe it is to lend money to you, i.e., the likeliness of you paying back your debt to them. In the United States, credit scores are awarded by three major companies. Since they use slightly different methods of scoring your credit, your score can vary slightly between them. What they all have in common, however, is that they put together your score based on your financial history (or lack thereof). How do they come about your score?

Parts of a credit score

Think of an Olympic diver who just took a perfect dive. The judges off to the side are going to score her on a few different factors: her approach, her flight, and her entry into the water. They'll award her a number based on her dive and then those numbers are averaged to give her a score. Credit is scored in a similar way. You aren't judged just based on your payments or just based on how long you've had a credit card. Rather, you're judged based on a combination of five main things. For your FICO score (the score used by the majority of banks and lenders) those are:
  • 35% - payment history
  • 30% - current debt
  • 15% - how long you've had credit
  • 10% - types of credit
  • 10% - new credit
As you can see, the most important factors that make up your credit score revolve around how much you owe and if you pay your bills on time. Having high amounts of debt or credit cards that are maxed out (meaning you hit the spending limit), your score can be lowered. Similarly, your score can be lowered every time you miss a bill payment. However, if you do miss a payment and your score is lowered, it can be recovered by making on-time payments. Your credit score is also influenced by the length of your credit history (15%): when you opened your first credit card or took out your first loan. The longer you've been making on-time payments the better. The last two factors that make up your score are the types of credit you have (10%) and new credit (10%). Having many different types of credit (home loan, credit card, student loan, auto loan, etc.) will improve your score so long as you're making on-time payments. However, opening up new credit rapidly is a red flag for lenders that you might be in financial trouble, hurting your score.    




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Posted by Collins & Demac Real Estate on 12/29/2016

Did you know your credit score is always changing? Your credit score could be one number on one day and a different figure the next and even vary from one credit reporting agency to the next. Your credit score also known as your FICO score is based on the information contained in your credit record. Since your credit file is always changing so is your score. Your credit record changes every time a company you have credit with reports an on-time payment — or more important, a missed payment that's now more than 30 days late. Your score changes each time your credit card balance changes or you apply for new credit. There are three main credit reporting agencies; Experian, TransUnion and Equifax. Another factor that could affect your score is that not all lenders report to all agencies. To know your credit score you can pull a free credit report from all three agencies once a year. Look for missing or incorrect information. It is important to get that resolved as soon a possible. Click here for more information on obtaining a free credit report.





Posted by Collins & Demac Real Estate on 10/13/2016

Credit scores are complicated. There are numerous companies who calculate credit reports. What's more, those companies have different versions of their credit calculators, so any given person can have tens or even hundreds of different credit scores. In this way, credit reports can seem subjective or arbitrary. While that may be true, credit scores can play a role in which credit cards we receive and what loans we get approved for. And now some employers are even running credit checks on their potential new hires. Read on to learn all you need to know about what goes into your credit score.

Who's FICO?

The industry leader when it comes to credit scores is FICO. They set the standard and started releasing credit scores to lenders in 1989. Since then, however, a number of new names have entered the market like VantageScore and CE score.

How is my score calculated?

Your FICO score is broken down accordingly:
  • 35% - Payment history
  • 30% - Amounts owed (debt)
  • 15% - Length of credit history
  • 10% - Types of credit used
  • 10 % - New credit
  1. Payment history The most important aspect of your credit score is repayment history. It includes information on all of your payments (or lack thereof) and whether you were late or on time. It takes into account things like foreclosures, repossessions, and settlements.
  2. Amounts owed (debt) This section is complicated by the fact that having debt isn't necessarily a bad thing for your credit score. It includes your debt-to-limit ratio, the number of accounts with debt owed, and the total amount of debt across all accounts. If you're keeping up with payments and not hitting credit limits, this section can work to your advantage. Owning huge amounts and having poor repayment habits will certainly harm your score.
  3. Length of credit history Being consistent in paying off your debt over a long period of time can be reflected positively on your credit score. Similarly, if you have a very short credit history, lenders are less likely to approve you for what they see as potentially risky loans. This section also includes the amount of time you've had certain accounts and how long it has been since you used those accounts.
  4. Types of credit used If you have proven that you have successfully managed multiple types of credit (retail cards, credit cards, student loans, mortgages, etc.) this will reflect positively on your credit score. A lack of credit diversity won't win you any extra points.
  5. New credit Beware of opening several new cards or taking on multiple loans within a short span of time. It will raise red flags to lenders that you are having financial difficulties and are a risky borrower.

Build good credit habits

Credit scores are daunting and we often overlook them if we aren't in current need of loans. But like maintaining your health, it's important to take preemptive measures to nurture your credit score. Here are some good habits to build that will save you money and stress in the long run:
  • Check your free credit report annually
  • Set up auto-pay on credit cards and loans and keep an eye on your checking account to make sure it has sufficient funds
  • If you are in financial trouble contact your lenders and ask about your options. Going AWOL is the worst thing you can do on your credit debt
  • Keep credit card balances low and avoid opening several cards within a short period of time
  • Take advantage of free online tools like Credit Karma to calculate your debt repayment
 





Posted by Collins & Demac Real Estate on 6/19/2014

If your credit score could use a boost it isn't as simple as just changing bad financial behaviors. Increasing your credit score is a process that takes time. The time it takes to improve your credit history can vary. Late payments can remain on your credit report for seven years, but typically if you clear all past-due debts and pay on time from then on, your score can begin to recover quickly. One late payment doesn't hurt you that much but a pattern of bad payments will really hurt you.  If you have a few late payments continue to use credit and pay on time every time. Demonstrate that you are managing your fiances well and your scores will begin to climb. If you have suffered a bankruptcy the effects can be long-lasting. According to myFico.com, a Chapter 13 bankruptcy can linger for seven to more than 10 years on your report. A Chapter 7 bankruptcy, or total liquidation, can affect your record for 10 years. It is vital to constantly monitor your credit report and review it for accuracy. You can obtain your report for free once every twelve months from annualcreditreport.com.







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